Long Beach Heritage is a nonprofit education and advocacy group promoting public knowledge and preservation of significant historical and architectural resources, neighborhoods, and the cultural heritage of Long Beach.

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In this Issue:

  • Long Beach Heritage Gala Awards Benefit
  • Houghton Park Buildings Facing Demolition
  • Long Beach Heritage Gala Awards Benefit
  • Winter Bembridge News
  • General Meeting to Be Held on Sunday, February 1
  • Quarterly Meeting with Development Services
  • Membership Report — December 2014
  • Silent Auction Items Needed

 

Long Beach Heritage Gala Awards Benefit

Karen H. Preservationist of the Year 2015Long Beach Heritage will hold its most important fundraiser of the year on February 26 beginning at 5:30 p.m. in the Grand Salon of the Queen Mary, a historic landmark Art Moderne ocean liner. Before the sit-down dinner, served at elegantly decorated tables, guests will have the opportunity to bid on desirable items from the silent auction and buy drinks from the no-host bar. Make sure that you arrive early to peruse the auction tables and bid on your favorite restaurant meals, vacation getaways, and antique objets d’art. Guests at the banquet will receive complimentary parking (stamped at the front table) as well. Hometown girl, Karen Highberger, has been selected as Preservationist of the Year. A product of St. Lucy’s Grammar School, St. Anthony’s High School, and Brooks College, Karen has dedicated decades of her life to historic preservation in Long Beach. Click Here to Read the Full Article.

 

Houghton Park Building Facing Demolition

By Louise Ivers

The Houghton family donated three acres of land for a lovely park in North Long Beach in 1924 and in 1927 the city bought 25 additional acres from them. That year the Native Sons of the Golden West planted trees in the new park. In 1930 a Spanish Revival style clubhouse with Moorish inspired exterior details was built for public programs in the park. An article in the Long Beach Argus printed on August 1, 1930 stated that it was “one of the most beautiful buildings of its size and kind in the city.” It was designed by George W. Ferris, who was an architectural designer working in the City Engineer’s office. This picturesque example of early twentieth century period revival construction has asymmetrical massing, recessed entrance porch with carved wooden posts topped by Moorish... Click Here to Read the Full Article.